Monday, January 14, 2008

Golden Globes: the winners, and brief fallout.

Best Supporting Actress - Cate Blanchett, I'm Not There
Best Song - "Guaranteed," Into the Wild
Best Actress, Musical or Comedy - Marion Cotillard, La Vie En Rose
Best Supporting Actor - Javier Bardem, No Country For Old Men
Best Original Screenplay - Joel and Ethan Coen, No Country For Old Men
Best Actress, Drama - Julie Christie, Away From Her
Best Original Score - Dario Marianelli, Atonement
Best Director Motion Picture - Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Best Actor, Musical or Comedy - Johnny Depp, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy - Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
Best Foreign Picture - The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Best Actor, Drama - Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood
Best Picture, Drama - Atonement


I’m so happy! I was so scared for Atonement, fearing that it might not even get Best Score, but it won two, including the biggie!

Aside from that, I’m pretty content, I like how all the awards are spread out this year, and it will probably be like that come Oscar time. Though I’m yet to see most of these movies, they all look and sound very exciting, with nothing hugely “Oscar begging”, so all is well. A couple of surprises too, with Julian Schnabel bagging Best Director. That film sounds v. interesting.

If I'm a teeensy bit miffed about anything, it's that Cate Blanchett won Best Supporting Actress. I haven't seen I'm not There so can't comment... but I guess I'm still annoyed that she got Double Nominations in the SAGs and Saoirse got nothing.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

let me see you move like you come from colombia.

Anonymous said...

Blanchett totally fucking deserved it.

Besty said...

It is weird that Atonement won best film without picking anything else in the big categories.

Anyway, you have to see No Country this weekend. or sooner. It's a masterpiece.

Blanchett_Fan said...

You don't like Blanchett? Ha, no wonder you got rejected by Cambridge.

Jose said...

As much as I loved Saoirse, Blanchett was my top pick for Supporting Actress.
Her performance will take your breath away.
I think it's rather sad people think she's overrated already, I mean, the woman gave perhaps the most groundbreaking performance of the year and all people come up with is "not her again". Why do we hide under the presence of brilliance?

Anonymous said...

Individuals

Medicine in the Ancient World

Aristotle
- As well as medicine, wrote about politics, philosophy, ethics and astronomy.
- Important because of his work developing biology, the study of living things.
- Said that all biology should be based on a methodical observation of plants and animals in the real world.
- His belief was that there was always a purpose to everything that Nature did.
- He carried out dissections of animals to see how they worked.
- Saw the heart as the key organ of the body.
- Aristotle was an influence on scientists for many centuries. In the Middle Ages his writings were held with great respect.
- His influence continued into the Renaissance and beyond. William Harvey was a great admirer of Aristotle.

Hippocrates
- Hippocratic collection, 60 medical books, not all of which were written by him.
- Hippocratic doctors were v. careful about the way they looked at patients and recorded their symptoms. Clinical observation, similar to today, kept detailed notes.
- By building up lots of case notes they were able to predict how an illness would develop. This ideas are summed up in two Greek works that are still used by doctors today diagnosis (the cause of a disease was identified by careful consideration of symptoms) and prognosis (the outcome of the disease that was predicted)
- Rejected supernatural beliefs about medicine. Called priests who offered cleansing ceremonies tricksters.
- Believed in preventative medicine. The best way of making sure that the humours stayed in balance was through healthy diet and exercise.
- Doctors should never mistreat their patients.
- Theory of the 4 Humours – there were 4 humours in the body: blood, phlegm, yellow bile and black bile. Illness occurred when there was too much of a particular humour.
- Doctors could help the body to balance these humours by blood-letting, by vomiting and emptying the bowels.

Galen
- Became a doctor because his father dreamt that Asklepios visited him.
- Influenced by Hippocratic ideas, accepted 4 humours.
- But still went further, Hippocrates said for nature to take its course, Galen used opposites. Bloodletting, even when the patient died due to loss of blood.
- Knowledge of anatomy weak in Hippocratic medicine.
- Galen cut up pigs and apes. Led to wrong beliefs about human anatomy.
- Mentioned a creator, so many religions were happy to follow his ideas.
- Big headed.

Medieval and Renaissance Medicine

Rhazes
- Stressed the need for careful observation of the patient.
- He was able to distinguish the different between measles and smallpox.
- He believed in the importance of a healthy environment.
- He was asked to become the first director of a new hospital in Baghdad – the meat rotting test.
- Saw himself as disciple of Galen, but thought all disciples should seek to improve the work of their masters. One of his books – Doubts About Galen.

Avicenna
- Produced a great encyclopaedia of medicine called The Canon, which covered anorexia and summarised Galen and Hippocrates, as well as Islamic writers.
- Like many Islamic doctors, he was very knowledgeable about the medical uses of drugs.

Paracelcus
- Controversial, Swiss.
- Considered himself to be better than Celcus, a Roman doctor.
- Rejected idea of 4 humours. Instead, he said that disease resulted from problems from chemicals in the body. Since the problem was chemical, the treatment should be too.
- Experimented with the use of chemicals to make new medicines.
- Gave talks in German instead of Latin.
- Burnt Galen and Avicenna’s cannon.
- Impact of Paracelcus was limited during his own lifetime. Few of his medical writings were published before he died. After his death a small number of followers continued his work, and explored further the use of chemical treatments in disease. The teaching of Galen remained unchallenged mostly.

Vesalius
- Most important in terms of changes in anatomy.
- Good education.
- Began in Padua as a faithful follower of Galen.
- Work at Padua, where there was an long established tradition of dissection, gave Vesalius access to a regular supply of dead bodies for dissection, executed criminals. As he carried out more and more he began to have doubts about Galen and concluded that Galen had only carried out dissections on animals. The human lower jaw was different from Galen’s descript.
- Began to write a comprehensive book about human anatomy, completed in 1542 and published the following year. On the Fabric of the Human Body. First modern anatomical textbook. Contained 23 full coloured pics. Without the invention of printing, wouldn’t have been possible.

Several key points were to be found in his great book on anatomy:
- Anatomy professors must base their work on dissection and must carry out dissection themselves.
- The evidence of the eye should be trusted more than the authority of old books.
- Anatomy was the key to further increases in medical knowledge.
- Doctor shad made mistakes in the past.

The book corrected several mistakes made by Galen:
- The sternum has three not seven parts.
- The liver does not have five parts of lobes.
- The septum of the heart is not porous.

His thoughts on the septum of the heart were a real breakthrough because they encouraged others to start work on the real answer to show how the blood went around the body.

Other anatomists follow Vesalius and built on his achievements. His immediate successor at Padua was Realdo.

Pare
- Turning point: work as a military surgeon.
- Cauterised (hot oil) gunshot wounds – painful. He didn’t do this because didn’t have supplies so one night he made up his own – dressing of egg yolk, rose oil and turpentine. Better.
- He showed that the bezoar stone was useuless.
- Criticized Vigo’s cauterisation technique.
- He treated amputations well. Tied cut ligatures and published his findings in 1552.
- Religious.
- Taught to turn baby in womb so it wouldn’t be born head first.
- Keen to get publicity for his findings.

William Harvey
- Physiology.
- Showed that blood circulates around the body.


Medicine in Industrial and modern World

Edward Jenner
- Inoculation wasn’t efficient against smallpox. But Jenner noticed that milkmaids who caught cowpox didn’t catch smallpox.
- Took pus from a girl who had cowpox and put it on James Phipps. He recovered. Vaca like cow.
- In 1805 Napoleon had his army vaccinated. The use of it spread.
- In 1980 the WHO declared hat smallpox had been removed from the world.
- Jenner made an impact because:
- - His work on James Phipps was carefully recorded and he published his results.
- - In 1799 he carried out a national survey which showed people who had suffered from cowpox did not catch smallpox.

James Simpson
- Used cholorofrm in 1847 to ease childbirth pain. Preferred it to ether which irritated lungs and gave off an inflammable gas. He began to use it for general surgery.
- There was general opposition to anaesthetics because they were unsure about side effects. Used in wrong amounts, it could kill. Others liked the idea of women suffering.

Florence Nightingale
- After fights with her family, she was allowed to become nurse.
- When the Crimean war broke out in 1854 she went to \Turkey to lead a party of nurses who were to care for sick and wounded soldiers.
- When the war over, Flo returned to UK to work on the reform of health in the army.
- In 1859 she published Notes on Nursing and for next 30 years tirelessly training nurses.
- In 1860 she set up the first training school for nurses.

Elizabeth Blackwell
- Had to go New York to train as a doctor.
- Qualified in 1847 and in 1857 opened the New York Infirmary for Poor Women and Children, staffed entirely by women.
- Before this, news of her achievement encouraged a British woman to do the same.

Anonymous said...

Individuals

Medicine in the Ancient World

Aristotle
- As well as medicine, wrote about politics, philosophy, ethics and astronomy.
- Important because of his work developing biology, the study of living things.
- Said that all biology should be based on a methodical observation of plants and animals in the real world.
- His belief was that there was always a purpose to everything that Nature did.
- He carried out dissections of animals to see how they worked.
- Saw the heart as the key organ of the body.
- Aristotle was an influence on scientists for many centuries. In the Middle Ages his writings were held with great respect.
- His influence continued into the Renaissance and beyond. William Harvey was a great admirer of Aristotle.

Hippocrates
- Hippocratic collection, 60 medical books, not all of which were written by him.
- Hippocratic doctors were v. careful about the way they looked at patients and recorded their symptoms. Clinical observation, similar to today, kept detailed notes.
- By building up lots of case notes they were able to predict how an illness would develop. This ideas are summed up in two Greek works that are still used by doctors today diagnosis (the cause of a disease was identified by careful consideration of symptoms) and prognosis (the outcome of the disease that was predicted)
- Rejected supernatural beliefs about medicine. Called priests who offered cleansing ceremonies tricksters.
- Believed in preventative medicine. The best way of making sure that the humours stayed in balance was through healthy diet and exercise.
- Doctors should never mistreat their patients.
- Theory of the 4 Humours – there were 4 humours in the body: blood, phlegm, yellow bile and black bile. Illness occurred when there was too much of a particular humour.
- Doctors could help the body to balance these humours by blood-letting, by vomiting and emptying the bowels.

Galen
- Became a doctor because his father dreamt that Asklepios visited him.
- Influenced by Hippocratic ideas, accepted 4 humours.
- But still went further, Hippocrates said for nature to take its course, Galen used opposites. Bloodletting, even when the patient died due to loss of blood.
- Knowledge of anatomy weak in Hippocratic medicine.
- Galen cut up pigs and apes. Led to wrong beliefs about human anatomy.
- Mentioned a creator, so many religions were happy to follow his ideas.
- Big headed.

Medieval and Renaissance Medicine

Rhazes
- Stressed the need for careful observation of the patient.
- He was able to distinguish the different between measles and smallpox.
- He believed in the importance of a healthy environment.
- He was asked to become the first director of a new hospital in Baghdad – the meat rotting test.
- Saw himself as disciple of Galen, but thought all disciples should seek to improve the work of their masters. One of his books – Doubts About Galen.

Avicenna
- Produced a great encyclopaedia of medicine called The Canon, which covered anorexia and summarised Galen and Hippocrates, as well as Islamic writers.
- Like many Islamic doctors, he was very knowledgeable about the medical uses of drugs.

Paracelcus
- Controversial, Swiss.
- Considered himself to be better than Celcus, a Roman doctor.
- Rejected idea of 4 humours. Instead, he said that disease resulted from problems from chemicals in the body. Since the problem was chemical, the treatment should be too.
- Experimented with the use of chemicals to make new medicines.
- Gave talks in German instead of Latin.
- Burnt Galen and Avicenna’s cannon.
- Impact of Paracelcus was limited during his own lifetime. Few of his medical writings were published before he died. After his death a small number of followers continued his work, and explored further the use of chemical treatments in disease. The teaching of Galen remained unchallenged mostly.

Vesalius
- Most important in terms of changes in anatomy.
- Good education.
- Began in Padua as a faithful follower of Galen.
- Work at Padua, where there was an long established tradition of dissection, gave Vesalius access to a regular supply of dead bodies for dissection, executed criminals. As he carried out more and more he began to have doubts about Galen and concluded that Galen had only carried out dissections on animals. The human lower jaw was different from Galen’s descript.
- Began to write a comprehensive book about human anatomy, completed in 1542 and published the following year. On the Fabric of the Human Body. First modern anatomical textbook. Contained 23 full coloured pics. Without the invention of printing, wouldn’t have been possible.

Several key points were to be found in his great book on anatomy:
- Anatomy professors must base their work on dissection and must carry out dissection themselves.
- The evidence of the eye should be trusted more than the authority of old books.
- Anatomy was the key to further increases in medical knowledge.
- Doctor shad made mistakes in the past.

The book corrected several mistakes made by Galen:
- The sternum has three not seven parts.
- The liver does not have five parts of lobes.
- The septum of the heart is not porous.

His thoughts on the septum of the heart were a real breakthrough because they encouraged others to start work on the real answer to show how the blood went around the body.

Other anatomists follow Vesalius and built on his achievements. His immediate successor at Padua was Realdo.

Pare
- Turning point: work as a military surgeon.
- Cauterised (hot oil) gunshot wounds – painful. He didn’t do this because didn’t have supplies so one night he made up his own – dressing of egg yolk, rose oil and turpentine. Better.
- He showed that the bezoar stone was useuless.
- Criticized Vigo’s cauterisation technique.
- He treated amputations well. Tied cut ligatures and published his findings in 1552.
- Religious.
- Taught to turn baby in womb so it wouldn’t be born head first.
- Keen to get publicity for his findings.

William Harvey
- Physiology.
- Showed that blood circulates around the body.


Medicine in Industrial and modern World

Edward Jenner
- Inoculation wasn’t efficient against smallpox. But Jenner noticed that milkmaids who caught cowpox didn’t catch smallpox.
- Took pus from a girl who had cowpox and put it on James Phipps. He recovered. Vaca like cow.
- In 1805 Napoleon had his army vaccinated. The use of it spread.
- In 1980 the WHO declared hat smallpox had been removed from the world.
- Jenner made an impact because:
- - His work on James Phipps was carefully recorded and he published his results.
- - In 1799 he carried out a national survey which showed people who had suffered from cowpox did not catch smallpox.

James Simpson
- Used cholorofrm in 1847 to ease childbirth pain. Preferred it to ether which irritated lungs and gave off an inflammable gas. He began to use it for general surgery.
- There was general opposition to anaesthetics because they were unsure about side effects. Used in wrong amounts, it could kill. Others liked the idea of women suffering.

Florence Nightingale
- After fights with her family, she was allowed to become nurse.
- When the Crimean war broke out in 1854 she went to \Turkey to lead a party of nurses who were to care for sick and wounded soldiers.
- When the war over, Flo returned to UK to work on the reform of health in the army.
- In 1859 she published Notes on Nursing and for next 30 years tirelessly training nurses.
- In 1860 she set up the first training school for nurses.

Elizabeth Blackwell
- Had to go New York to train as a doctor.
- Qualified in 1847 and in 1857 opened the New York Infirmary for Poor Women and Children, staffed entirely by women.
- Before this, news of her achievement encouraged a British woman to do the same.

Emma said...

Right, thanks for that!

Emma said...

Right, thanks for that!

Anesha said...

Hi Nice Blog . In this, the body is studied by regions rather than by organs. This is of importance to the surgeon who exposes different planes after the skin incision and who, of course, must be perfectly familiar with structures as he explores the limbs and Human Anatomy study cavities.