Thursday, February 23, 2006

20 Best Performances in a 2005 film.

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2005.... As a Year for Performances: 20 Best Performances

In alphabetical order...
Amy Adams as "Ashley" in Junebug

As the chatty, pregnant woman, Adams brings a warmth and wit to her character that is both effective and affecting. In a film full of fine performances, Amy rules the show.


Catherine Keener as "Harper Lee" in Capote

As Capote's best friend, personal bodyguard and conscience, Keener embodies Harper Lee perfectly - she is brutally honest, no-nonsense, yet completly warm and caring.

Catherine Keener as "Trish" in The 40-Year-Old Virgin

As the only woman for Andy, Keener excels in a very different role, perfectly and unexpectadly drawing the line between comedy and drama.
Cillian Murphy as "Patrick "Kitten" Murphy" in Breakfast on Pluto
David Strathairn as "Edward R. Murrow" in Good Night, and Good Luck
Usually cast in character parts, Strathairn plays a kind, brave, but essentially normal, man with noble naunce. His powerhouse performance is there to amaze us; and scare us, at how similar things are now.
Don Cheadle as "Graham Waters" in Crash
In a film made up of excellent performances, Cheadle stands out as the silently tragic detective. Detective Graham is the soul of the film, and from the opening, dreamlike overture to the devastating denouement.
Eric Bana as "Avner" in Munich
Felicity Huffman as "Bree" in Transamerica
Heath Ledger as "Ennis del Mar" in Brokeback Mountain
Jake Gyllenhaal as "Jack Twist" in Brokeback MountainImage hosting by Photobucket
Jake Gyllenhaal as "Anthony Swofford" in Jarhead
Joan Allen as "Terry Ann Wolfmeyer" in The Upside of AngerImage hosting by Photobucket
Joaquin Phoenix as "Johnny Cash" in Walk the Line
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Laura Linney as "Joan Berkam" in The Squid and the Whale
Li Gong as "Hatsumomo" in Memoirs of a Geisha
Maria Bello as "Edie Stall" in A History of Violence
Michelle Williams as "Alma Beers" in Brokeback MountainImage hosting by Photobucket
Peter Sarsgaard as "Troy" in Jarhead
BEST PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR
Phillip Seymour Hoffman as "Truman Capote" in Capote
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It's mainly his performance that makes Capote the masterpiece that it is. Phil expertly marks the two sides of Capote - humorous, and devastating. It would have been so easy to go wrong, playing a man who'd dedicated his life playing a caricature of himself, but if anything, Hoffman underplays, in a role that is funny, accurate, canny, and, as shown in the "I did all I could" scene, very, very tragic.
Reese Witherspoon as "June Carter Cash" in Walk the LineImage hosting by Photobucket

7 comments:

soph said...

Where's Scarlet for Match Point

Anonymous said...

or bill for broken flowers

Anonymous said...

best regards, nice info »

Anonymous said...

Shortly after the four left, the field that was Shipbourne Common dissolved into nothingness and their journey began.
But, however sharp their intellect, they realised they still required the assistance of

THE HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO THE COUNTRYSIDE

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Countryside is the most advanced book of its kind. With detailed descriptions of almost every part of the countryside known to man. And more.

A far and distant voice told the girls that the only form of defence necessary was that of a simple flannel. The voice was not heard by the girls. Carrying a flannel is all the girls eventually realised they needed. (After carrying 3 stone rucksacks across the country.)

Looking at the Hitchhiker’s guide the girls saw something reassuring. For in bright comforting letters on the back of the hitchhiker’s guide are the words:
DON’T PANIC
Unfortunately for the girls, they panicked, through no fault of their own. It was just female programming.

Journal Entry #1
We have not walked far yet, but we have already come across some kind of woods. Here there appear to be some new species of trees.
These trees lash out at seemingly random intervals, right at6 the face, which, after several strikes, becomes quite painful.

We turned to the Hitchhiker's Guide to the countryside, in the hope of finding some way of defending ourselves. It told us that these branches attack anywhere they detect brainwaves and, basically that we should stop thinking. This would have been much easier if we had been born males.

Journal Entry #2
We started walking again after a short break. We had to walk through a field of strange animals. They were white with two legs, a beak and a pair of wings. To our annoyance they were continually making a squalling noise.
We consulted the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the countryside to try and work out what they were.

Journal Entry #3
Last. Fruit bearing trees in straight lines all around us. Looking up these details in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Countryside.

Journal Entry #4
It turns out we were in the right, what was it called? Ah yes, the orchard. The map must have been wrong, it couldn’t have anything to do with us…


Journal Entry #5
After a brief rest we ventured towards a likely looking field.
Moments after entering the field we were approached by hundreds of creatures covered in what can only be described as clouds, speaking a language known as … “Baa…”
Once again we were baffled and were forced to consult The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Countryside.

Journal Entry #4
We just escaped a field marked “Beware the Bull” of both entrance and exit. As we entered the field we opened our copy of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Countryside to find more about the strange creatures that stood behind the gate we had just closed behind us. We were slightly disturbed at the results our search produced, as all of us were wearing red clothing in some shape or form. This was the reason for our speedy crossing and exiting of this meadow.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Countryside… and words associated

Orchard - an area of land on which fruit or nut trees are grown, especially commercially. Easy to get lost in here, so upon entering, bring drinks.
Grass - a low green narrow-leaved plant that grows in fields and gardens, is eaten by animals such as cows and sheep, and is used to make lawns and playing fields. If you see no green in the countryside, consult own map. Is very likely that you are in swimming pool.
Stinging nettles - a wild plant with jagged leaves that are covered with fine hairs or spines that sting when touched. Are rife in forests, if stung by one treat with.
Hiking boots - a durable leather boot, usually rising to just above the ankle, with a thick sole and heavy tread, designed for hiking. On a trip through Shipbourne, trainers just won’t do.
Camp - a place where short-term accommodation has been temporarily put up or sited, in the form, for example, of tents or camper vans for holidaymakers. Often takes mere mortals several hours to get one satisfactory.
Bull - adult male of any breed of domestic cattle or other bovine animal
Sheep - a stocky hooved mammal with ribbed horns that is raised for its wool and meat. Very white. Very absent minded. Very cute.
Horse - a large four-legged animal with a mane, tail, hooves, and a long head. Horses are kept as domestic animals for riding, pulling vehicles, and carrying loads. If spotted admire from nearby or afar.

Anonymous said...

There are 12 chapters.

01. So Long
02. The Countryside is a big map
03. Kidnap
04. Don’t Think – Rescue!
05. Orchard
06. Way Out
07. Arriving
08. Inventions, Camping, Teachers and other Students

Chapter 9 - Leaving the Campsite
At 8:30 am, the group got up, ready to leave the campsite. But not without a quick trip round to check that:
- We hadn’t left anything.
- We’d all been to the toilet.
- We had enough water for the trip.

We also had to tidy up the tents. There were two, and the smaller one folded up without much of a fight. But the other one was large and seemed to enjoy acting as a tent, rather than folding up.
Satisfied, we put on our rucksacks and made our way out.

Chapter 10 – The Field Dude
Several minutes out of the campsite, we were faced with the most curious looking man – white bearded and raggle taggled. Stopping to drink some water, we saw that he looked severely dehydrated and offered him some.
“Here, have some of this,” Emma said, handing over her bottle of Evian.
He drank is quickly, water dripping out from the sides as he wolfed his way through the bottle.
“You look absolutely dried out,” Emily said. “Don’t you know there’s a tap just half a mile away?”
The man stared at all of us with complete disbelief. “Are you… telling the truth?” he asked slowly, sizing each one of us out, staring into our eyes to check whether or not we were telling the truth.
“Show me,” he commanded.
Exchanging nervous looks (the pressure was onto us now, heaven forbid we got it wrong and deprive a thirsty old man of his water), we pointed him in the direction and gave him directions that we felt were hopefully foolproof. He bade us good day and we went on our way.

We had not walked for 20 minutes when we saw him again, sitting near a lily tree, drinking water. Unsure of what to do, we tried to edge past him, for there was something in his aura that made us slightly nervous. But we did not go unnoticed.
“Thanks so much for the water!” he exclaimed eagerly, rushing forward to shake each of our hands. We politely smiled.
“You’re welcome,” Emily H said, “But if you don’t mind, we really have to go now-”
“We’re doing our Duke of Edinburgh, you see,” Hannah explained, “and the sooner we finish, the longer we can spend relaxing.”
The Field Dude’s eyes widened, and it was clear that some brilliant idea was brewing in his mind. He explained to us that this was the perfect way to pay us back for the water – by telling us the secret of the countryside, which was bound to

Chapter 11 – Field Dude’s Sayings
Through the fields we saw everything that a hitch walker could have hoped to see – horses (of all different colours), flowers (of all different colours, though mainly grey),
The trek was getting tedious and two of us were out of water. It helped to bear in mind that we were only 3km away from it ending entirely, but

Chapter 12 - The Meaning of Duke of Edinburgh, any chances of Silver?
Exhausted and utterly thankful, we all slumped onto the nearest bench as we reached the end. It was interesting, and quite pleasing, to see that we had come first! But there was no time to gloat. We had to remember what we had been told by the enigmatic man of the field.

He had given us 12 clues:

01. l
02. o
03. o
04. k
05. a
06. t
07. t
08. h
09. e
10. m
11. a
12. p

Anonymous said...

Shortly after the four left, the field that was Shipbourne Common dissolved into nothingness and their journey began.
But, however sharp their intellect, they realised they still required the assistance of

THE HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO THE COUNTRYSIDE

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Countryside is the most advanced book of its kind. With detailed descriptions of almost every part of the countryside known to man. And more.

A far and distant voice told the girls that the only form of defence necessary was that of a simple flannel. The voice was not heard by the girls. Carrying a flannel is all the girls eventually realised they needed. (After carrying 3 stone rucksacks across the country.)

Looking at the Hitchhiker’s guide the girls saw something reassuring. For in bright comforting letters on the back of the hitchhiker’s guide are the words:
DON’T PANIC
Unfortunately for the girls, they panicked, through no fault of their own. It was just female programming.

Journal Entry #1
We have not walked far yet, but we have already come across some kind of woods. Here there appear to be some new species of trees.
These trees lash out at seemingly random intervals, right at6 the face, which, after several strikes, becomes quite painful.

We turned to the Hitchhiker's Guide to the countryside, in the hope of finding some way of defending ourselves. It told us that these branches attack anywhere they detect brainwaves and, basically that we should stop thinking. This would have been much easier if we had been born males.

Journal Entry #2
We started walking again after a short break. We had to walk through a field of strange animals. They were white with two legs, a beak and a pair of wings. To our annoyance they were continually making a squalling noise.
We consulted the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the countryside to try and work out what they were.

Journal Entry #3
Last. Fruit bearing trees in straight lines all around us. Looking up these details in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Countryside.

Journal Entry #4
It turns out we were in the right, what was it called? Ah yes, the orchard. The map must have been wrong, it couldn’t have anything to do with us…


Journal Entry #5
After a brief rest we ventured towards a likely looking field.
Moments after entering the field we were approached by hundreds of creatures covered in what can only be described as clouds, speaking a language known as … “Baa…”
Once again we were baffled and were forced to consult The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Countryside.

Journal Entry #4
We just escaped a field marked “Beware the Bull” of both entrance and exit. As we entered the field we opened our copy of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Countryside to find more about the strange creatures that stood behind the gate we had just closed behind us. We were slightly disturbed at the results our search produced, as all of us were wearing red clothing in some shape or form. This was the reason for our speedy crossing and exiting of this meadow.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Countryside… and words associated

Orchard - an area of land on which fruit or nut trees are grown, especially commercially. Easy to get lost in here, so upon entering, bring drinks.
Grass - a low green narrow-leaved plant that grows in fields and gardens, is eaten by animals such as cows and sheep, and is used to make lawns and playing fields. If you see no green in the countryside, consult own map. Is very likely that you are in swimming pool.
Stinging nettles - a wild plant with jagged leaves that are covered with fine hairs or spines that sting when touched. Are rife in forests, if stung by one treat with.
Hiking boots - a durable leather boot, usually rising to just above the ankle, with a thick sole and heavy tread, designed for hiking. On a trip through Shipbourne, trainers just won’t do.
Camp - a place where short-term accommodation has been temporarily put up or sited, in the form, for example, of tents or camper vans for holidaymakers. Often takes mere mortals several hours to get one satisfactory.
Bull - adult male of any breed of domestic cattle or other bovine animal
Sheep - a stocky hooved mammal with ribbed horns that is raised for its wool and meat. Very white. Very absent minded. Very cute.
Horse - a large four-legged animal with a mane, tail, hooves, and a long head. Horses are kept as domestic animals for riding, pulling vehicles, and carrying loads. If spotted admire from nearby or afar.

Anonymous said...

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

When the bumbling humdrum Arthur (wonderfully played by The Office’s Martin Freeman) has his house demolished and he’s left homeless, things seemingly couldn’t get any worse. But that turns out to be just the beginning – it’s goodbye planet Earth and hello galaxy as he’s forced into a far-away quest to answer a far-away question – just what is the meaning of life?

For first time director Garth Jennings, it may seem a bit of a risk to film a big-screen adaptation of one of Britain’s best-loved books. But starting with the opening sequence of some dolphin’s renditions of “Thanks for all the fish” to the closing lines, you know you’re in for a ride every bit as original and quirky as the source material.

The characters that Arthur comes are every bit as odd as you’d expect, yet you can’t help loving them for their eccentricities – glum robot Marvin is absolutely charming in his self-indulgent malaise. The casting is spot on, from Mos Def as Ford Prefect to Bill Nighy, tied together neatly with Stephen Fry’s dry narration. Kudos too to the amazing visuals, which successfully bring the universe to us.

There are low points, of course – the added romance element is uncomfortable and some of the best jokes are underplayed, but amongst the many shoddy book-to-film adaptations that have tarnished our screens over the years, it’s encouraging to see a film with a heart as well as a sense of humour … with the effects to go with it.